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    Then Comes Summer Reading

    Nancy Brashear and Carolyn Angus
     | May 29, 2017

    As the school year ends, it is time to encourage students to include regular visits to their local libraries (and perhaps sign up for a summer reading program) over summer vacation. In this week’s column, we review recently published books, as well as some old favorites, for lazy days of summer reading.

    Ages 4–8

    And Then Comes Summer. Tom Brenner. Ill. Jaime Kim. 2017. Candlewick.

    and-then-comes-summerIn a series of reflections, a young boy considers the endless joys of summer. The smells, sounds, sights, and activities of summer are presented in lyrical text and cheery acrylic illustrations featuring the boy, his dog, and his friends. The activities the boy enjoys, including selling lemonade, marching in the fourth of July parade, and camping at the lake, will have young children thinking about their own anticipated summer pastimes.

    —CA

    The Jolley-Rogers and the Monster’s Gold (The Jolley Rogers #3). Jonny Duddle. 2017. Templar/Candlewick.

    Jolley RogersMatilda rejoins the Jolley-Rogers on another buccaneer adventure after finding a bottle with a treasure map inside. They set sail for the mysterious island, singing foreboding treasure hunting shanties. Mayhem erupts when Grandpa’s peg leg is stolen by a menacing sea monster, and their ship soon ends up at the not-so-deserted Banana Island with monkeys, a grizzly old pirate, and Banana Bill (a baker extraordinaire). When the Jolley-Rogers leave Matilda safely behind on the island and set out to find the sea monster, they find themselves in great peril. It’s up to Matilda to save the day with a plan—which may or may not include 99 retired old pirates and a boatload of bananas and gold pieces! Clever, black-and-white digital illustrations contribute to this great read-aloud for young swashbucklers.

    —NB 

    Little Pig Saves the Ship. David Hyde Costello. 2017. Charlesbridge.

    Little PigLittle Pig is too young to join his older siblings for a week at sailing camp, and must stay behind with Grandpa and Poppy. A book of sailors’ knots and a piece of rope from his oldest brother hold his interest until, one night, Poppy shows Little Pig a toy sailboat he’s building. The next day, Little Pig sews the sails and Poppy carves small figures to “man” the ship. They sail the ship every day until disaster strikes and Little Pig must put his rope-knotting skills to work. Ink-and-watercolor cartoon illustrations with speech balloons add to the fun of this charming adventure.

    —CA

    That’s What Friends Are For. Suzanne Chiew. Ill. Caroline Pedler. 2017. Tiger Tales.

    That's What Friends are forBadger and his friends enjoy splashing in a stream under the summer sun. When Mouse reports that the stream has slowed to a trickle, they all worrywill they have enough water to drink, swim, do laundry, and keep the flowers alive? Trekking upstream, they discover boulders blocking the stream and work together to move them. Colorful, detailed illustrations bring the community of clever critters to life in this gentle lesson on problem-solving and teamwork. 

    —NB

    There Might Be Lobsters. Carolyn Crimi. Ill. Laurel Molk. 2017. Candlewick.

    There Might be LobstersEleanor can’t coax her small dog, Sukie, from the stairs leading to the beach. Sukie has a list of reasons to avoid the beach, ending with “and, besides, there might be lobsters.” Eleanor carries Sukie and her stuffed toy monkey, Chunka Munka, down to the sand, and Sukie’s list of fears grows as she gets closer to the water. When Chunka Munka is washed out by the tide, however, Sukie puts aside her fears—including the possibility of encountering lobsters in the ocean—to rescue him.

    —CA

    Ages 9–11

    Blueberry Pancakes Forever (Finding Serendipity #3). Angelica Banks. 2017. Henry Holt.

    Blueberry Pancakes ForeverIn the final book of the trilogy, Serendipity Smith (the author of the popular Vivienne Small series) is stuck in a period of year-long grief (and writer’s block) after the death of her husband. Serendipity arranges for her friend Colette to watch over her daughter, young Tuesday McGillycuddy, so she can return to the Land of Story to heal and begin writing again. When a villain from her mother’s book kidnaps her friend Vivienne, Tuesday is swept into the Land of Story. She must dig deep inside herself to write her way out of this dangerous plot and back into a life filled with love, good memories of her father’s blueberry pancakes, and new stories.

    —NB

    Effie Starr Zook Has One More Question. Martha Freeman. 2017. Paula Wiseman/Simon & Schuster.

    Effie Starr ZookEffie Starr Zook, an 11-year-old girl from a “well fixed” New York City family (thanks to Effie’s great grandfather, the inventor of the barf bag) is spending the summer with her aunt and uncle at Zook Farm in Pennsylvania while her parents tour the world on a test flight of a solar airplane. Expecting to be bored, she’s pleased to meet Moriah Yoder, whose family lives on the edge of the property. She quickly learns there’s “bad blood” between the Zooks and the Yoders. Effie, a pro at asking questions, wants answers but gets none from her evasive relatives. The more she learns about her famous great grandfather, Mr. Yoder (the founder of the Beards of America movement), and Mr. Odbody (a bookstore owner and the only African American in town), the more questions she has. Uncovering family secrets will keep Effie busy for the summer.

    —CA

    Tricked (Fairy Tale Reform School #3). Jen Calonita. 2017. Sourcebooks Jabberwocky/Sourcebooks.

    TrickedGilly Cobbler, former Fairy Tale Reform School (FTRS) student, worries that her younger sister, Anna—who was sent to FTRS for blowing up Red’s shop with her friends Hansel and Gretel— is in danger. The evil Rumpelstiltskin (Mr. Stilts), now in charge of FTRS, has a new school motto: If you can’t become a better person, become a better villain. Before Gilly can get Anna out of the school, she’ll have to get herself thrown back in. In this magical mashup of mermaids, fairies, pirates, and princesses, as Gilly and her crew work to banish Mr. Stilts, they learn that it’s not just important to be good, but to discover what they are good at.

    —NB

    Ages 12–14

    The Harlem Charade. Natasha Tarpley. 2017. Scholastic.

    Harlem CharadeSeventh graders Jin, Elvin, and Alex are researching class project ideas about their Harlem neighborhood when Elvin’s grandfather is mysteriously attacked. Elvin, locked out of the apartment, ends up living on the streets. The three friends work together to learn what happened to Elvin’s grandfather, who is in a coma. When their sleuthing uncovers a politician’s plan to build “Harlem World,” a nefarious money-making scheme that will cause some residents to lose their homes and businesses, they know they must follow the clues, even as they lead them into danger. Notes about the historical context, events, and locations in the book provide a background for this historical mystery.

    —NB

    When My Sister Started Kissing. Helen Frost. 2017. Margaret Ferguson/Farrar Straus Giroux. 

    When My Sister Started KissingClaire and Abigail had always loved spending a month each summer with their father at his cabin at Heartstone Lake. This year everything is different. Their father has remarried, and expecting a baby. And something between Claire and Abigail has changed. Claire is confused over the changes that are playing out this summer. In an endnote for this beautifully crafted novel in verse, Frost explains her use of different poetic forms to give voice to key characters: quatrains for Claire, free verse for Abigail, and acrostics for the Lake.

    —CA  

    Ages 15+

    Camp So-And-So. Mary McCoy. 2017. Carolrhoda Lab/Lerner.

    Camp So-and-SoLured by a glossy brochure, 25 girls find themselves at remote Appalachian Camp So-And-So. Once their parents leave, the girls realize that something’s not right; facilities and activities are not what the brochure promised, and there is a complete lack of adult supervision. The occupants of the cabins will need to ban together to survive challenges specially chosen for each cabin. McCoy weaves the story from cabin to cabin, across five separate plots, with comments from an omniscient narrator and a counselor-in-training. Readers won’t be able to put down this weird and totally absorbing horror story about a very dangerous summer at camp.

    —CA

    Zenn DiagramZenn Diagram. Wendy Brant. 2017. Loft/Kids Can.

    Reclusive 17-year-old math genius Eva has a special gift. When she touches another person, or anything that belongs to that person, she can instantly read them. This makes her a great math tutor; coaches know that she can be counted on to raise the GPAs of athletes sidelined by poor grades. Because she picks up pain through touch, Eva avoids direct contact with others. She senses an intense emotional “fractal” when she accidentally touches Zenn—a tutee—but as romance blossoms and they embrace, there is no physical agony. Just as Eva decides that it is time to break loose from her self-imposed prison and learn more about life, something happens that cracks her world apart.

    —NB

    Nancy Brashear is Professor Emeritus of English from Azusa Pacific University, in Azusa, California. Carolyn Angus is former Director of the George G. Stone Center for Children's Books, Claremont Graduate University, in Claremont, California.

    These reviews are submitted by members of the International Literacy Association's Children's Literature and Reading Special Interest Group (CL/R SIG) and are published weekly on Literacy Daily.

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    Sleuths, Detectives, and Spies

    Nancy Brashear and Carolyn Angus
     | May 22, 2017

    Readers of all ages are invited to uncover clues, identify suspects, gather evidence, crack codes, and solve crimes alongside the sleuths in these well-crafted mystery and detective stories.

    Ages 4–8

    A Case in Any CaseA Case in Any Case (Detective Gordon #3). Ulf Nilsson. Trans. Julia Marshall. Ill. Gitte Spee. 2017. Gecko.

    Detective Gordon, a toad and longtime chief detective, has taken an extensive leave (a retirement, perhaps). Buffy, a young mouse, is now Detective Buffy. She takes her responsibilities seriously but misses Gordon, especially at night when she hears scrabbling noises at the police station windows. When two kindergarteners (a squirrel named Evert and a rabbit called Karen) go missing on a class excursion to the forest, the police officers don their spiffy police hats, organize a search party, and set out to safely return the children. A smattering of silly songs and an abundance of soft illustrations add to the fun of this chapter book, which makes a great read-aloud choice.
    —CA  

    King & KaylaKing & Kayla and the Case of the Missing Dog Treats (King & Kayla). Dori Hillestad Butler. Ill. Nancy Meyers. 2017. Peachtree.

    King, a big golden dog, helps his owner, Kayla, figure out who stole the peanut butter dog treats she made for her friend’s new puppy. King is the chief suspect, but he didn’t take the treats…so who did? King does everything he can (in dog-speak, which Kayla doesn’t understand) to lead her in the right direction. While Kayla busily writes pages about what she knows—and doesn’t know—about the case, King follows his nose to the stinky culprit. This mystery for beginning readers, told from King’s point of view, is broken into five bite-sized chapters with clues in the pictures and storyline.
    —NB

    Olivia the SpyOlivia the Spy. Ian Falconer. 2017. Caitlyn Dlouhy/Atheneum/Simon & Schuster.

    Olivia’s know-it-all, free-spirited, self-assured behavior has gotten her in trouble. After overhearing her mother say that she wished to send her away “until she develops some sense,” Olivia decides to investigate. She then hears her parents agree that they should take her to an institution. Worried, Olivia asks her teacher, “What is an institution?” Her answer convinces Olivia she’s going to prison. Olivia (and young readers) learn a gentle lesson about eavesdropping, although Olivia still contends that she wasn’t eavesdropping. Welcome back, Olivia.
    —CA

    Ages 9–11

    The Case of the Counterfeit CriminalsThe Case of the Counterfeit Criminals (The Wollstonecraft Detective Agency #3). Jordan Stratford. Ill. Kelly Murphy. 2017. Alfred A. Knopf/Random House.

    In this historical-mystery-steampunk mash-up, the Wollstonecraft Detective Agency—run by two young girls, Ada Byron Lovelace (the first computer programmer) and Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin (the author of Frankenstein)—takes on a new case that involves fossil hunter Mary Anning and her beloved missing dog. Fossil fakers are blackmailing Anning; to get her dog back, she must authenticate fake dinosaur bones at the British Museum within three days. With Ada orchestrating the case, clues come together with word games, logic puzzles, sinister doll-like minions, Charles Dickens, smoke bombs, and rollicking action. The book includes short character biographies. Readers who missed the first two books in this mystery series will want to catch up while awaiting the release of the fourth book.
    —NB

    The Goldfish Boy. Lisa Thompson. 2017. Scholastic.

    The Goldfish BoyTwelve-year-old Matthew Corbin (Goldfish Boy) is a different sort of sleuth. Blaming himself for his baby brother’s death five years earlier, Matthew has psychological problems that leave him unable to leave his house, fearful of germs, and obsessed with cleanliness. He spends his days peering out his bedroom window, watching the activity in the cul-de-sac neighborhood. When a toddler next door goes missing, Matthew investigates. Taking an everyone-is-a-suspect approach, and with two neighbor kids doing the legwork, he strives to solve the case of the disappearing child that has baffled the police.
    —CA

    The Impossible Clue. Sarah Rubin. 2017. Chicken House/Scholastic.

    The Impossible clueSeventh-grade math whiz Alice Jones is recruited to find Dr. Learner, a scientist who disappeared from a locked room while working on a top-secret invisibility suit. Using keen observation, logic, and common sense, Alice (assisted by classmates Sammy and Kevin) searches for clues to this seemingly insolvable mystery. Alice soon realizes she is not the only one looking for Dr. Learner. With screeching car tires and danger around each corner, Alice knows mysterious men are hot on her trail. This middle-grade mystery invites inquisitive readers to search for answers alongside these three young sleuths.
    —NB

    Ages 12–14

    First Class Murder (Wells and Wong Mysteries #3). Robin Stevens. 2017. Simon & Schuster.

    First Class MurderIt’s the summer of 1935, and schoolmates Daisy Wong and Hazel Wells take a European excursion on the famed Orient Express. Soon after boarding, they sense that the other passengers have something to hide. During dinner, a scream is heard coming from one of the compartments in the Calais-Simplon-Istanbul Carriage. When the locked door is knocked down, Mrs. Daunt, the wealthy wife of William Daunt (owner of Daunt’s Diet Pills), is found dead. A locked-room murder, a jewel theft, a suspected spy, forged documents, and a first-class car full of likely suspects are all elements of a case that the crime-solving Wells & Wong Detective Society duo cannot resist taking on. Readers may want to read Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express to compare plots.
    —CA

    Vampires on the Run (Quinnie Boyd Mystery #2). C. M. Surrisi. 2017. Carolrhoda/Lerner.

    Vampires on the RunThirteen-year-old Quinnie Boyd suspects that Ella’s Aunt Cecil and Uncle Edgar (writers of the popular Count La Plasma series), who are visiting for the summer, are real vampires, killing animals and wreaking havoc in the small Maine town of Maiden Rock. Why else would they avoid sunlight and cover mirrors? And who are the two unknown fishermen lurking around Ella’s home, apparently stalking the writers in the middle of the night? Quinnie, Ella, Ben (a sailing expert), and Dominic (a technology surveillance geek) decide to investigate, leading to two stolen boats and a high-speed chase. These fearless teens could end up grounded for the summer, or much worse. This adventurous, spooky, funny mystery is an engaging read for middle-grade readers.
    —NB

    Ages 15+

    Missing. Kelley Armstrong. 2017. Crown/Random House.

    MissingLike most teens, 17-year-old Crane Winter can’t wait to leave Reeve’s End, KY—her depressed, coal-mining hometown in Appalachia. Her only regret will be leaving the wilderness that she loves and where she spends much of her time to escape her abusive, alcoholic father. When she rescues Lennon Bishop, a stranger who has been attacked in the woods, she learns that he is trying to find out what happened to a missing friend. When Lennon also goes missing, Crane begins to question what really  happens to teens who leave Reeve’s End. The menace of an elusive stalker and a pack of feral dogs prevails throughout this fast-paced, suspenseful thriller.
    —CA

    Splinter. Sasha Dawn. 2017. Carolrhoda Lab/Lerner.

    SplinterWhen 16-year old Sami’s mother disappeared 10 years ago, Sami was convinced that she had deserted her, even though the police suspected foul play. When Sami was found wandering, no amount of questioning could restore her recollections of that day and no investigation turned up answers—or a body. Each November on the anniversary of her mother’s disappearance, Sami still receives a postcard that she turns over to the local sheriff. When new evidence surfaces that involves another missing person, a box of stained clothes, and old photographs, her father is back in the spotlight as a suspect. With the new investigation underway, her dad and stepmother separated, and the neighbors’ teenage nephew in town for the summer, Sami’s world becomes splintered in ways she could never have imagined.
    —NB

    You Don’t Know My Name. Kristen Orlando. 2017. Swoon Reads/Feiwel and Friends.

    You Don't Know My NameSeventeen-year-old Reagan Hillis changes names and identities constantly as her parents—top-secret spies—move around the world. She’s been trained to follow in their footsteps as a spy. This year in New Albany, OH, Reagan finally begins to feel like a normal teenager as she gets to know Luke, a neighbor and classmate, who is in Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) with plans for a military career. When Reagan’s parents are kidnapped in retaliation for a murder, Reagan barely escapes being taken, too. Both she and Luke, who was with her, are put in protective custody. In a whirlwind of intrigue and suspense, Reagan and Luke head to South America to rescue her parents before they are killed. This fast-paced thriller delivers on action, hooking readers into the sequel.
    —NB

    Nancy Brashear is Professor Emeritus of English from Azusa Pacific University, in Azusa, California. Carolyn Angus is former Director of the George G. Stone Center for Children’s Books, Claremont Graduate University, in Claremont, California.

    These reviews are submitted by members of the International Literacy Association's Children's Literature and Reading Special Interest Group (CL/R SIG) and are published weekly on Literacy Daily.


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    More Graphic Novels: Have They Taken Us by Surprise?

    By Stan Steiner
     | May 15, 2017

    Graphic novels tend to be more engaging and fast-paced while facilitating essential visual literacy skills, making them well-suited for younger audiences. More educators are embracing graphic novels as a way to hook reluctant readers who may not be interested in traditional texts. This list includes some of the most vibrant new primary-level graphic novels for readers of all ages, abilities, and interests.

    Ages 4–8

    The Amazing Crafty Cat (Crafty Cat #1). Charise Mericle Harper. 2017. First Second/Roaring Brook.

    The Amazing Crafty CatYoung Birdie’s positive energy, love of crafting, and strong imagination come together in her creation of the Amazing Crafty Cat—her superhero counterpart who can fix any problem. Crafty Cat’s powers are tested when disaster strikes; Birdie trips on the way to school, dropping and destroying her perfect birthday cupcakes. Is Birdie’s birthday celebration ruined, or will Crafty Cat come to the rescue? Together, Birdie and Craft Cat show readers how to handle bullies, embarrassing moments, and uncomfortable situations with a positive mindset.


    Hotel Strange 4The Ghosts in the Clouds
    (Hotel Strange #4). Katherine Ferrier & Florian Ferrier. Ill. Katherine Ferrier. 2017. Graphic Universe/Lerner.

    At Hotel Strange all occupants are doing their part to get things ready for winter. Their planning comes to a halt when grumpy ghosts arrive to capture Mr. Snarf, a new arrival at the hotel. After a brief encounter with the ghost patrol, the people at Hotel Strange learn that Mr. Snarf is wanted for crimes in his homeland, the Kingdom of Ghosts. A group of hotel guests believe Mr. Snarf has been unjustly accused and decide to launch a rescue mission by way of air balloon. The Kingdom of Ghosts is full of silly rules, and the rescue crew is thrown in jail for picnicking. An exercise in wit leads to their eventual freedom and a surprise realization for all inhabitants of the kingdom.

    My Kite is StuckMy Kite Is Stuck! and Other Stories (Duck, Duck, Porcupine). Salina Yoon. 2017. Bloomsbury.

    Loud and bossy Big Duck, quiet and smart Little Duck, and friendly and kind Porcupine are best friends, despite their personality differences. As they play together, they use their collective problem-solving skills and humor to solve challenges like how to free a kite from a tree, how to make new friends, and how to build the best lemonade stand.


    Word playWordplay
    (Toon into Reading). Ivan Brunetti. 2017. Toon.

    After learning about compound words in class, Annemarie starts to see them everywhere. One day her obsession with discovering compound words goes too far at dinner, and Dad sends Annemarie to her bedroom, where she finds even more. Brunetti’s engaging and humorous approach to learning compound words inspires readers to try their own hands at wordplay.

    Ages 9–11

    The-Big-Bad-FoxThe Big Bad Fox. Benjamin Renner. 2017. First Second/Roaring Brook.

    Fox and Wolf are determined to get into the hen house to steal some tasty eggs. When Fox manages to sneak past the lazy guard dog and steal three eggs, they decide to raise the chicks until fully grown to provide them with a bigger, more satisfying meal. The plan goes awry when the chicks hatch and call Fox “Mommy.” The unexpected twists and turns that follow as Fox stumbles through parenthood are sure to have readers laughing out loud.

    HiloThe Great Big Boom (Hilo #3). Judd Winick. 2017. Random House.

    Hilo, a robot from another dimension, continues to have adventures with his two best friends, D.J. and Gina, in this latest book of this funny, gripping, and action-packed series. Hilo is still able to fly between planets, but suffers from a mysterious memory loss that is linked to his strange appearance on Earth. The army has picked up on Hilo’s superpowers and throws him and D.J. in jail. When Hilo starts tinkering with the prison security devices, readers are transported into Hilo’s flashbacks. Readers are taken on one rollicking intergalactic adventure after another with the dynamic trio

    Making ScentsMaking Scents. Arthur Yorinks. Ill. Braden Lamb & Shelli Paroline. 2017. First Second/Roaring Brook.

    Yorinks spins the dog world on its nose in this heartwarming tale about Mickey, a boy raised in a family of bloodhounds by his dog-loving parents. His life is perfect until a tragic accident occurs, and he is sent to live with an aunt and uncle who do not like kids or dogs. In the end, however, Mickey’s dog-like instincts help him win his relatives’ love.


    Star ScoutsStar Scouts
    (Star Scouts #1). Mike Lawrence. 2017. First Second/Roaring Brook.

    This uproarious adventure stars two Star Scouts, one on earth and the other in space. As the new girl in town, Avani Patel’s father enrolls her in Flower Scouts to make friends. Avani dislikes the troop; she wants to have adventures, but all the other scouts just like to gossip. Mabel, a Star Scout in space, must identify an alien from Earth to earn a collection badge. Mabel abducts Avani, and they become fast friends through their shared knack for adventure. Life gets exciting for both Avani and Mabel when they compete against a team of bullies for the most badges at Camp Andromeda.  

    Ages 12–14

    Pigs-Might-FlyPigs Might Fly (Pigs Might Fly #1). Nick Abadzis. Ill. Jerel Dye. 2017. First Second/Roaring Brook.

    Pigdom Plains is the backdrop to this fantastical tale starring Lily Leanchops, who must use her scientific prowess to save all of pigkind. Most hogfolk in Pigdom Plains believe that if pigs were meant to fly, they would have been born with wings. Lily Leanchops, the daughter of a renowned inventor, is determined to prove them wrong and sets out to build an aircraft. Pigs Might Fly is a classic story of good versus evil, complicated by father–daughter love, magic, and politics.  

    Volcano TrashVolcano Trash. Ben Sears. 2017. Koyama.

    This futuristic story follows Volcano Trash and his sidekick robot Hank, a pair of criminals with good intentions. When Volcano Trash and Hank take the rap for a string of break-ins, they are caught by the corrupt police force and put in jail. Hank decides to take the blame so that Volcano Trash can go. Volcano Trash, however, is lost without his partner. In a swashbuckling adventure, he carries out a risky and clever plan to liberate Hank.

    Ages 15+

    Another-CastleAnother Castle (Grimoire #1). Andrew Wheeler. Ill. Paulina Ganucheau. 2017. Oni.

    The story begins when Princess Misty of Beldora is captured by Lord Badlug, the feared, murderous ruler of a neighboring kingdom. Lord Badlug’s plan is to marry Princess Misty and lead Beldora into ruin and chaos. Chivalry, wit, and determination take Princess Misty on a death-defying path to heroism. Along the way, she befriends an assortment of characters with special powers, who help and challenge her mission.


    Colonial ComicsColonial Comics: New England: 1750-1775.
    Jason Rodriguez (Ed.). 2017. Fulcrum.

    Prefaced with factual background information, this story focuses on lesser-known figures and events from an important period in American history. Readers are introduced to such characters as Benjamin Franklin’s older brother James, Phyllis Wheatley, Molly Ockett, Thomas Hutchinson, and Samson Occom. They also get new perspectives on such events as the Stamp Act, the Boston Tea Party, and Paul Revere’s ride. The story is equal parts educational and entertaining.

    YvainYvain: The Knight of the Lion. M. T. Anderson. Ill. Andrea Offermann. 2017. Candlewick.

    Yvain, well trained in King Arthur’s Court, finds more adventure than he bargained for when an unexpected confrontation puts him in direct combat with Sir Esclado, duke of a neighboring castle. Yvain is trapped inside the castle and learns Sir Esclado has died from the wounds he inflicted. As Yvain watches the funeral from his cell window, he realizes he is in love with Sir Esclado’s wife, Lady Laudine. For Yvain to win her heart, he must prove his bravery and defend her land.

    Stan Steiner teaches children’s/young adult literature at Boise State University. He has had a long relationship with bringing awareness to multicultural literature through his teaching and publications. Interacting with kids keeps him abreast of popular reads as is the case with graphic novels.

    These reviews are submitted by members of the International Literacy Association's Children's Literature and Reading Special Interest Group (CL/R SIG) and are published weekly on Literacy Daily.
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    Graphic Novels: The Bridge Between Visual and Print Media

    By Stan Steiner
     | May 08, 2017

    When words are not enough, graphics allow writers to reach new heights of creativity, experimentation, and emotion. While varying in form, the recently-published books on this list all use imagery to explore rich historical, biographical, and cultural themes and impart ageless life lessons.   


    Ages 48

    Bird & Squirrel on Fire (Bird & Squirrel #4). James Burks. 2017. Graphix/Scholastic.

    Bird & Squirrel on FireBird and Squirrel are unlikely best friends. Squirrel anxiously longs for the comfort of his home, never wanting to venture far. Bird, on the other hand, craves adventure and has no fear. One day, Squirrel returns from a day of exploring to find his home engulfed in flames. Squirrel is frantic; all he can think about are his ruined possessions. Through this disaster, Squirrel ultimately learns the value of friendships, and the true meaning of "home." 


    Dog Man Unleashed
    (Dog Man #2). Dav Pilkey. 2017. Graphix/Scholastic.

    Dog Man UnleashedDav Pilkey, creator of Captain Underpants, is back with this second installment of Dog Man. This series tells the story of an inseparable cop and police dog: the best crime fighters in the city. One day, a huge explosion in the police station leaves the cop with a serious head injury, and the dog with a disfigured body. A surgeon decides to save their lives by attaching the dog’s head to the police officer’s body, thus the birth of Dog Man. Pilkey’s child-friendly humor flourishes in this new crime stoppers series.


    A Perfect View (Cici: A Fairy Tale
    #3). Cori Doerrfeld. Ill. Tyler Page & Cori Doerrfeld. 2017. Graphic Universe/Lerner.

    CiciCici is a fairy who sees the world differently. Her Grandma tries to warn her that a fairy who does not know her own powers is likely to encounter mischief and unexplained happenings. When Cici decides to take her new friend Kendra on her first camping trip, a near-disaster teaches Cici that cooperation and friendship are important in both the fairy world and the real world.


    Something’s Fishy
    (Giggle & Learn). Kevin McCloskey. 2017. Toon.

    Something's FishyThe story opens with a "fishy" alphabet, each letter corresponding to an exotic fish and a description of its unique characteristics. Readers will learn surprising facts, for example, not all fish have fins and scales. Something's Fishy concludes with the history of the goldfish, lending insight into this common household pet.


    Ages 911

    Bad Kitty Takes the Test (Bad Kitty). Nick Bruel. 2017. Neal Porter/Roaring Book.

    Bad Kitty Takes a TestIn this satirical episode, Kitty panics when the Society of Cat Aptitude, noting her history of bad behavior, requires her to take an aptitude test that will determine her feline status. As she experiences the pressures of test-taking, Kitty learns a lot about herself, and realizes that everyone has different strengths and weaknesses. Kitty’s experience with testing may change readers’ mentality toward their next exam.


    Flying Machines: How the Wright Brothers Soared
    (Science Comics). Alison Wilgus. Ill. Molly Brooks. 2017.

    wright brothersLooking for great STEM literature? In How the Wright Brothers Soared, Katharine Wright narrates the scientific journey that lead to modern aviation. In real life, Katharine played an important role in her brothers’ success. The book includes brief biographies on key players in the aviation world, along with a glossary of aeronautical terminology.



    Real Friends: A True Story About Cool Kids and Crybabies
    . Shannon Hale. 2017. First Second/Roaring Brook.

    Real FriendsWhile intended for young people, this memoir will resonate with anyone who has ever felt like an outcast. Real Friends follows fifth-grader Shannon Hale as she struggles to make friends, keep friends, hold onto her popularity, get along with her family, and overcome feelings of anxiety and insecurity. Through these painful growing pains, Hale learns to recognize and cherish the elements of real friendship.


    Ages 1214

    News Prints (News Print #1). Ru Xu. 2017. Graphix/Scholastic.

    News PrintsSet in the 1920s with futuristic notions of robots, time travel, and other civilizations, News Prints is filled with page-turning, action-packed mystery. The book stars spunky Lavender Blue, a female orphan disguised as a newsboy, who sells papers to make money during a costly war. Blue’s heroic actions lead her to realize the importance of being true to oneself and to others.




    One Weirdest Weekend
    (Pix #1). Gregg Schigiel. 2017. Image Comics.

    One Weirdest WeekendIn her first original graphic novel, Pix the “Superteen” is a hero who wears a cape, rescues people and pets, and prevents imminent disasters—all while avoiding the pitfalls of her own youthful naiveté. Between rescue operations, Pix battles the trials of teenagehood—bad dates, even worse cell service, and an overprotective mom.


    Ages 15+

    MWD: Hell Is Coming Home. Brian David Johnson & Jan Egleson. Ill. Laila Milevski & Karl Stevens. 2017. Candlewick.

    MWD: Hell is Coming HomeGeared towards older readers, MWD: Hell Is Coming Home tells the story of Liz Mastrangelo, a former soldier in the Iraq War who suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Part of the story is told through flashbacks: her memories of bonding with a military working dog, juxtaposed by the sobering realities of a war zone. The rest of the story follows her struggle to reenter into relationships and society as she copes with mood swings and other symptoms associated with PTSD.


    Spill Zone
    (Spill Zone #1). Scott Westerfeld. Ill. Alex Puvilland. 2017. First Second/Roaring Brook.

    Spill ZoneFans of Scott Westerfeld’s sci-fi novels will enjoy this suspenseful new series. The Spill Zone is a futuristic toxic site that has eviscerated Poughkeepsie, New York. Addie and her younger sister, Lexa, orphaned after their parents were killed, are two of the remaining survivors living near the zone. Addie keeps them alive by traveling at night into the Spill Zone, where she takes eerie photographs that she can sell to rich art collectors. Addie’s bravery and survival skills are put to the test when she receives a million-dollar offer to venture deeper into the lethal territory than ever before.


    Wires and Nerve
    (The Lunar Chronicles). Marissa Meyer. Ill. Doug Holgate. 2017. Feiwel and Friends.

    Wires and NerveLinh Cinder, Queen of Luna, and Kai, the Emperor of Earth, are working to unite their two worlds. Their dream is met with skepticism, especially from the wolf-hybrid soldiers trained under the evil, late Queen of Luna, who have been wreaking havoc and destruction all over Earth. So far, they are no match for Iko, an android working for Cinder. Action unfolds as each of the nine heroes from the Lunar Chronicles are reintroduced in this futuristic adventure series.


    Stan Steiner
    teaches Children’s/Young Adult Literature at Boise State University, Boise, Idaho. He has had a long relationship with bringing awareness to multicultural literature through his teaching and publications. Interacting with kids keeps him abreast of popular reads as is the case with graphic novels.

    These reviews are submitted by members of the International Literacy Association's Children's Literature and Reading Special Interest Group (CL/R SIG) and are published weekly on Literacy Daily.


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    Series and Sequels

    BY NANCY BRASHEAR AND CAROLYN ANGUS
     | May 01, 2017

    Series are perennial favorites with readers of all ages. This column features first books in new series as well as stand-alone sequels. We have included some early chapter books for younger readers and more complex plots in a variety of genres for older readers.

    Ages 4–8

    Agnes and ClarabelleAgnes and Clarabelle (Agnes and Clarabelle #1). Adele Griffin & Courtney Sheinmel. Ill. Sara Palacios. 2017. Bloomsbury.
    Agnes Pig and Clarabelle Chicken are best friends. In four short episodic chapters, organized around the seasons of the year, Agnes and Clarabelle enjoy doing things together and help each other face fears and accept challenges. Appropriate text features (such as breath-sized lines of text and controlled-yet-interesting vocabulary) and lively illustrations, rendered in colored pencil and watercolor washes and digitally enhanced, support newly independent readers. After meeting these bosom buddies in these engaging stories, young children will be primed for reading Agnes and Clarabelle Celebrate! (2017), published simultaneously, in which the friends celebrate four holidays together.
    —NB

    Charlie and MouseCharlie & Mouse (Charlie & Mouse #1). Laurel Snyder. Ill. Emily Hughes. 2017. Chronicle.
    Readers meet young siblings, Charlie and Mouse, over four short chapters in this new easy reader series. In “Lumps,” Charlie wakes up and, eager to start the day’s activities, pokes at the lump beside him in bed to wake up his younger brother. Together they make their way down the hall to awaken two more lumps, their mom and dad. In “Party,” the celebration they plan ends up being “the best party ever” for the children of the neighborhood. In “Rocks,” their money-making project, selling rocks, is a success but in an unexpected way. In “Bedtime Banana,” the boys postpone bedtime by asking for a story, a song, and bananas before finally going to sleep planning to ask for an even tastier bedtime snack the next night. Colorful illustrations complement the text, showing the brothers sharing their mini-adventures throughout the day.
    —CA

    Fizz and the Police Dog TryoutsFizz and the Police Dog Tryouts (Fizz Police Dog Adventures #1). Lesley Gibbes. Ill. Stephan Michael King. 2017. Kane Miller.
    Fizz is “a small cute ball of white, fizzy, fuzzy fur,” as well as a brave, clever, superfast Bolognese who wants to be a police dog, not a champion show dog. At the Police Dog Tryouts, Fizz passes the Bark Test and the Scare Test, but it is Amadeus the Awesome, “the biggest, nastiest dog Fizz had ever met,” who brings the burglar down in the Chase-and-Catch Test. Fizz's dreams of being Sunnyvale’s next City Police Dog are over, but with his lovable look, he is perfect for the Undercover Dog Division. After reading Fizz and the Police Dog Tryouts, newly independent readers will be eager to read the three other simultaneously-published Fizz Police Dog adventures.
    —CA

    Sam the Man Sam the Man & the Rutabaga Plan (Sam the Man #2). Frances O’Roark Dowell. Ill. Amy June Bates. 2017. Caitlyn Dlouhy/Atheneum/Simon & Schuster.
    Second-grader “Sam the Man,” who doesn’t like vegetables, is given a rutabaga for a class science project. He soon grows fond of “Rudy,” draws a smiley face on the odd-looking vegetable, and carries it around in his backpack in a box of worm dirt. Sam bargains with his neighbor, Mrs. Kerner, for permission to make a compost pile at her house, and he invites his classmates to contribute their mushy vegetables to it at the end of the project. When Sam finally pulls Rudy out of his backpack to add to the compost, however, he discovers that the rugged rutabaga is not rotting—and has a surprise for all of them. Pencil sketches throughout the book add to the fun. Readers who missed Sam’s first adventure will enjoy reading Sam the Man and the Chicken Plan (2016).
    —NB

    Ages 9–11

    Audacity Jones Steals the ShowAudacity Jones Steals the Show (Audacity Jones #2). Kirby Larson. 2017. Scholastic.
    It is the early 1900s, and eleven-year-old orphan Audacity "Audie" Jones from Miss Maisie’s School for Wayward Girls is again sleuthing, this time with Pinkerton Detective Cypher in New York City at the Hippodrome Theater. Audie, her friend Bimmy, Detective Cypher, and Theodora (the scientist who created Houdini’s upcoming best illusion ever, vanishing an elephant in front of a live audience) go undercover as a juggling act, The Pomegrantos. With the help of Audie’s clever cat, Min, they foil a rapscallion’s scheme to ruin Houdini. An author’s note discusses historical authenticities and liberties in writing this historical thriller. Readers who missed the first book, Audacity Jones to the Rescue (2016), will want to read it while waiting for the next book in the series. 
    —NB

    Dragon CaptivesDragon Captives (The Unwanteds Quest #1). Lisa McMann. 2017. Aladdin/Simon & Schuster.
    This spin-off from the Unwanteds series begins ten years later with twelve-year-old twins Fifer and Thisbe Stowe (along with their friend Seth) defying their older brother, Alex, head mage of Artimé, to answer the plea of ice blue dragon Hux for help to free his siblings. Enslaved by the Revinir, an evil ruler, the dragons are rapidly outgrowing their wings, soon to no longer able to fly. Useless to their captor, they will be killed. The twins, with their uncontrollable, untrained magical abilities, must somehow reach the dragons, create larger dragon wings for them, and rescue them from captivity. Just when their dangerous quest turns out to have possibly fatal consequences, what happens sets readers up for the next book in the series.
    —NB

    Ages 12–14

    Carmer and GritCarmer and Grit (The Wingsnatchers #1). Sarah Jean Horwitz. 2017. Algonquin.
    A chance meeting between thirteen-year-old orphaned Felix Cassius Tiberious Carmer III, a magician’s apprentice to Antoine the Amazifier, and Grettifrida Lonewing, a teeny one-winged faerie princess, leads to an odd alliance. Grit agrees to use her real magic to help Carmer improve his mechanical inventions used in the Amazifier’s illusions. The act desperately needs improvement if the magician is to win first prize at the Seminal Symposium of Magickal Arts in the city of Skemantis. In exchange, Carmer will help Grit uncover the mystery surrounding the disappearance of Seelie faeries from the faerie kingdom in Skemantis’ public park, Oldtown Arboretum. Carmer and Grit face off against a magician/mad scientist who has created automatons (including Wingsnatchers and Autocats) that terrify fairies and people on the streets of Skemantis and a Hyperiopower machine that uses fae magic to generate electric energy. The worlds of faeries, magicians, and steampunk technology come together in this fast-paced, action-packed fantasy.
    —CA

    Last Day on MarsLast Day on Mars (Chronicles of the Dark Star #1). Kevin Emerson. 2017. Walden Pond/HarperCollins.
    It is the year 2213. The sun is expanding “into a red giant, swallowing Earth and the inner planets of the solar system, before dying down to a white dwarf” billions of years before expected. Now almost all the humans who abandoned Earth and colonized Mars are on giant space ships headed toward remote planet Aaru-5. The last ship to leave Mars before it becomes uninhabitable is scheduled to leave in twenty-four hours. Thirteen-year-olds Liam and Phoebe are in this last group because their parents are finishing a project that will be needed for the successful colonization of Aaru-5. The teens find themselves making life-and-death decisions (including discovering and outsmarting aliens and surviving explosions and avalanches) with a fearless abandon that will leave science fiction fans impatiently waiting for the continuation of the Chronicles of the Dark Star.
    —CA

    Ages 15+

    Agent of ChaosAgent of Chaos (The X Files Origins #1). Kami Garcia. 2017. Imprint/Macmillan.
    In this thriller set in 1979, readers learn how seventeen-year-old Fox Mulder became interested in investigation of the paranormal. His mother, still distraught over the unsolved disappearance of his younger sister five years earlier, sends him to spend his senior year with his emotionally-detached father in Washington, D.C. There he meets Gimble, a Dungeons & Dragons player, whose father is a retired military conspiracy theorist. After Mulder’s friend Phoebe comes to visit, the three teens work together on solving the mystery of another young missing girl and find themselves on the trail of a serial killer. Mulder’s newly-honed profiling skills bring him to the attention of the FBI, which pegs him as a prospective agent. X-File fans will also want to read Jonathan Maberry’s The Devil’s Advocate (2017), which introduces fifteen-year-old Dana Scully, to find out how she also became a FBI recruit.
    NB 

    Revenge of the Evil LibrarianRevenge of the Evil Librarian (Evil Librarian #2). Michelle Knudsen. 2017. Candlewick.
    Seventeen-year-old Cynthia and her boyfriend, Ryan, who fought alongside her to save their school from the demon librarian, Mr. Gabriel, in The Evil Librarian (2016), are spending the summer at musical theater camp. Cyn has not told Ryan about the agreement she made with the demoness who helped them escape from hell. Diabolic action ramps up as she discovers that Mr. Gabriel may not be dead after all and might be looking for revenge. Cyn’s realistic, slightly snarky, narration and non-stop action will carry readers through a roller-coaster storyline full of humor and horror. And then there is that agreement between Cyn and the demoness to pull readers into the next book.
    —NB

    Nancy Brashear is Professor Emeritus of English at Azusa Pacific University, in Azusa, California. Carolyn Angus is former Director of the George G. Stone Center for Children's Books, Claremont Graduate University, in Claremont, California.

    These reviews are submitted by members of the International Literacy Association's Children's Literature and Reading Special Interest Group (CL/R SIG) and are published weekly on Literacy Daily.
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