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    Graphic Novels

    By Barbara A. Ward
     | Apr 30, 2018

    Covering a wide variety of genres, topics, and narrative styles, the graphic novel offers a highly visual format for engaging all types of readers and for making cross-curricular connections. This week’s column highlights some recently published graphic texts that are strong choices for inclusion in classroom and library collections.

    Ages 4–8

    Monsters Beware! (Chronicles of Claudette #3). Jorge Aguirre. Ill. Rafael Rosado. 2018. First Second/Roaring Brook.

    Monsters Beware!Claudette marches to her own beat—a quality that goes unappreciated by many in her town. When Mont Petit Pierre hosts the Warrior Games, she's eager to use her sword-fighting skills to bring glory to her hometown. But after her brother, Gaston, and friend, Marie, join her team, the marquis softens the competition events because his wife doesn’t want to endanger their daughter. To Claudette's dismay, the teams compete in fierce bouts of butter churning, table-setting, and weaving. Claudette’s team does not fare well, and just when she is close to victory in one event, she must make a hard choice.

    New Shoes. Sara Varon. 2018. First Second/Roaring Brook.

    New ShoesFrancis the donkey is thrilled to make shoes for Miss Manatee, a talented calypso singer popular in Guyana, where the story is set. There's just one problem: He needs more tiger grass, an important material for his custom-made shoes. When he realizes that Nigel, his usual supplier, has disappeared, Francis must travel through the jungle himself to find what he needs. Along the way, Francis, accompanied by Rhoda, a friendly parrot, faces several challenges, including unfamiliar terrain and a river crossing, and meets several helpful animals. The back matter includes photographs of the places and animals taken by Varon in Guyana to use as references as she was creating the book.

    Ages 9–11

    Bad Kitty Camp Daze (Bad Kitty #11). Nick Bruel. 2018. Neal Porter/Roaring Brook.

    Bad KittyWhen a head injury causes Kitty to think she's a dog, Puppy is so traumatized by her strange behavior that he is sent to a camp to recover from his trauma. Uncle Murray's Camp for Stressed-Out Dogs provides an idyllic setting for canines to recuperate and get back their canine confidence. But this canine kingdom is in trouble when Kitty smuggles herself into camp. Kitty struggles with learning basic dog skills, such as fetching and swimming, but she enjoys the campfire stories. After sniffing some catnip, she channels her inner cat goddess and returns to her cat self, darting into the woods. But the woods are no place for a feline, even one like Bad Kitty, and she and Uncle Murray, her would-be rescuer, come face to face with a bear. Nick Bruel doesn't show readers what happens to the bear, but it's quite clear that it wasn't pretty, judged by how proudly Kitty leaves the battleground with her head and tail held high.

    Sparks! Ian Boothby. Ill. Nina Matsumoto. 2018. Graphix/Scholastic.

    Sparks!An intelligent, talking litter box narrates this humorous yet inspiring story. After two cats, August and Charlie, escape from an animal testing lab, they decide to fight local crime. Disguised in a mechanical dog suit, the partners leap to the rescue when someone is in peril. Meanwhile, a strange couple with an adorable baby appears at the most surprising places and times. Alert readers will realize right away that they can't be trusted, and won't be surprised when Charlie is lured into their home. The villains even persuade the cats’ squirrel friend, Steve, to betray them. While the friendships depicted here aren't perfect, August proves that he will do anything for Charlie.

    Ages 12–14

    The Dragonet Prophecy (Wings of Fire Graphic Novel #1). Tui T. Sutherland. Adapt. Barry Deutsch. Ill. Mike Holmes. 2018. Graphix/Scholastic.

    Wings of FireThis graphic novel version of the first book in Sutherland’s popular fantasy series provides insight into the dragons' personalities and how desperately the five dragonets, who are destined to change the world, want to escape from their underground prison. Had one of them not been threatened by their minders, they still might have remained hidden beneath that mountain. In this book, readers watch Clay, the mudwing dragon, develop and resist some of his darker urges. Vibrant artwork depicts the brave but perilous escape of Clay and Tsunami and dramatic battle scenes.

    Hermes: Tales of the Trickster (Olympians #10). George O’Connor. 2018. Neal Porter/First Second/Roaring Brook.

    HermesOnce again, George O'Connor brings the classic myths of Greek gods and goddesses in all their glorious imperfection to life, focusing on trickster Hermes in this latest book. Knowledgeable readers will know to question anything they see or hear from Hermes. The son of Zeus, Hermes is able to slip from the cave where his mother is hiding him to avoid Hera’s wrath, and steal Apollo's cows on his first day of life. From there, he wreaks havoc in Olympus and on Earth. Complemented by lavish, detailed artwork, sometimes relying on panels sliced into interesting strips and sometimes featuring a double-page spread of an important scene, the storytelling is engaging with subtle character development hinting at the human frailties of some of the gods and goddesses.

    Robots and Drones: Past, Present and Future (Science Comics). Mairghread Scott. Ill. Jacob Chabot. 2018. First Second/Roaring Brook.

    Robots & DronesAlmost as irresistible as a potato chip from a newly opened bag, each book in the Science Comics series deep dives into a specific topic—in this case, robots and drones. Depicted visually with vivid colors and in panels of different shapes and sizes, the science concepts are easy to understand. From Pouli, a mechanized bird invented in 350 BCE in Italy, and on to the karakuri ningyo in the 1600s in Japan, and all the way to modern times when rovers travel across the terrain of planets and virtual assistants such as Alexa and Siri respond to the voices of their owners, it's clear that robots have been part of our lives longer than we realized. While readers learn a lot about the usefulness of robots and drones, which may have an even greater impact on the future, the book challenges some assumptions about them. The book also explores fears associated with robots and raises ethical questions about artificial intelligence. Back matter includes snippets about 25 interesting and noteworthy robots.

    Ages 15+

    Brazen: Rebel Ladies Who Rocked the World. Pénélope Bagieu. Trans. Montana Kane. 2018. First Second/Roaring Brook.

    BrazenThis collective biography in graphic novel format highlights 29 “rebel ladies” who brazenly took risks and changed their little corners of the world. The characters include familiar names, such as Nellie Bly, Mae Jemison, and Peggy Guggenheim, as well as unspoken heroes, such as Agnodice, Giorgina Reid, and Sonita Alizadeh. Bagieu devotes several multi-paneled pages to detail each subject's life from birth to death with milestones along the way, represented through meaningful colors and symbols. The individual panels rely on intricate drawings and carefully chosen colors to bring the subjects—women whose activities made them forces to reckon with—to life. The artwork is so detailed that readers can see facial wrinkles clearly present and eyes filled with intelligence, awareness, and determination.

    The Prince and the Dressmaker. Jen Wang. 2018. First Second/Roaring Brook.

    The Prince and the DressmakerMuch to his dismay, Prince Sebastian's parents have decided that it's time for him to take a bride. The prince is troubled because he worries that his penchant for wearing dresses will be revealed. His secret has been guarded by two trustworthy individuals, one of whom is Frances, his dressmaker, who has designed several exquisite gowns he has worn on public outings under the guise of Lady Crystallia. But Sebastian’s insistence on secrecy threatens his relationship with Frances and her ambitions as a designer, since no one can associate her with the prince’s hidden life. In a sense, she, too, is kept in a closet because of this. But Sebastian’s fondness for women’s couture is revealed in a very public and humiliating way. Pushing firmly against boundaries about gender, appearance, and expectations, this graphic novel is also highly entertaining. Read it for the love story. Read it for the secrets. Read it for the gowns. But above all, read it to open your heart.

    Speak: The Graphic Novel. Laurie Halse Anderson. Ill. Emily Carroll. 2018. Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

    SpeakGiven its pitch-perfect metaphors and descriptions of nature as well as it current relevance, this ground-breaking story of a sexual assault translates powerfully into a graphic format. Readers observe Melinda's first fumbling attempts at creative expression, and then her work as it transforms, revealing much about what she has endured over the school year. Readers will cheer as Melinda finally finds her voice, holds a shard of glass to the throat of her once- and would-be rapist, and urges the other girls to call the police. Even though the graphic novel version of the story has been updated so that there are references to cell phones and technology, those additions aren't intrusive. This story will resonate with teen readers, who will feel connected to Melinda through the powerful, stark black-and-white illustrations. 

    Barbara A. Ward teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in literacy at Washington State University, Pullman. She spent 25 years teaching in the public schools of New Orleans, where she worked with students at every grade level, from kindergarten through high school, as well as several ability levels. She is certified in elementary education, English education, and gifted education. She holds a bachelor's degree in communications, a master's degree in English education from the University of Tennessee and a PhD in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of New Orleans.

    These reviews are submitted by members of the International Literacy Association's Children's Literature and Reading Special Interest Group (CL/R SIG) and are published weekly on Literacy Daily.

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    Debut Authors

    By Barbara A. Ward and Carolyn Angus
     | Apr 23, 2018

    Ah, the thrill of discovery! While for travelers, joy comes in discovering a spectacular scenic view or special restaurant, for bibliophiles, the pleasure arrives while reading a book by a new author, one whose work holds promise for future literary offerings. This week’s column features books by debut children’s and young adult authors who caught our attention.

    Ages 4–8

    Alma and How She Got Her Name. Juana Martinez-Neal. 2018. Candlewick.

    AlmaAlma is a small girl with a big name: Alma Sofia Esperanza José Pura Candela. When Alma shows her father how she must tape on an extra strip of paper to fit her name on a printed page, he says, “Let me tell you the story of your name. Then you decide if it fits.” He shows her photos from an album and tells her about each of the relatives for whom she is named. Alma loves the stories, but wants to know about Alma. He replies, “You are the first and the only Alma. You will make your own story.” The illustrations were done as print transfers with graphite and colored pencils. In “A Note from Juana” for her first book as both author and illustrator, Martinez-Neal, who was born in Lima, Peru, and now lives in the U.S., tells about her long name and invites readers to explore the story of their own names.
    —CA

    Nimesh the Adventurer. Ranjit Singh. Ill. Mehrdokht Amini. 2018. Lantana.

    Nimesh the AdventurerBright, whimsical, collage-style illustrations provide a glimpse into one young boy's vivid imagination. Nimesh turns the mundane experience of walking home at the end of the school day into a series of adventures as he encounters a dragon, swims with a shark, survives an avalanche, and meets a princess in the park. Each scene and revelation is more and more outlandish, and by the time Nimesh reaches home, readers will be ready for just about anything except what happens. This picture book encourages readers to speculate about what Nimesh will do next and to see the storytelling possibilities in the world around them while appreciating Nimesh's imagination and seriousness as he addresses his unnamed companion (who just might be the reader).
    —BW  

    A Storytelling of Ravens. Kyle Lukoff. Ill. Natalie Nelson. 2018. Groundwood/House of Anansi.

    A Storytelling of RavensThe pairing of Kyle Lukoff’s witty wordplay and Natalie Nelson’s colorful, imaginatively detailed illustrations (made with gouache paint, ink drawings, found photographs, and digital collage) offers a playful exploration of collective nouns used to reference groups of animals: a nuisance of cats, a memory of elephants, a smack of jellyfish, a shrewdness of apes, and 10 more. For example, a double-page spread showing five giraffes nibbling on a tall Christmas tree humorously and sensibly (based upon the giraffe’s feeding habits) illustrates, “The tower of giraffes didn’t know where this new tree had come from, but it was delicious.”
    —CA

    Ages 9–11

    The Outlaw. Nancy Vo. 2018. Groundwood/House of Anansi.

    The OutlawAuthor–illustrator Nancy Vo uses text sparingly but effectively, employing illustrations to fill the blanks in this powerful story set in the Old West. Residents of a small town dread visits from “the Outlaw,” known for his “trail of misdeeds,” and are relieved when he disappears. After a long absence, a stranger rides into the derelict town and begins to fix things in need of repair. Eventually, as he quietly goes about his tasks, some townsfolk recognize him and become angry as they recall his past transgressions. The Outlaw says nothing, but a small boy steps up and declares, “Leave him alone! He’s trying.” The book's concluding lines—"So the Outlaw continued to make amends. And maybe that was what mattered in the end"—prompt reflection about human nature and forgiveness. Vo’s illustrations, created in ink, watercolor, and newsprint transfer of newspaper clippings and fabric patterns typical of the 1850s and 1860s, effectively set the scene for this thought-provoking tale.
    —BW

    Winterhouse. Ben Guterson. Ill. Chloe Bristol. 2018. Christy Ottaviano/Henry Holt.

    WinterhouseWhen her uncaring aunt and uncle with whom she lives send 11-year-old orphan Elizabeth Somers on a bus to spend the holidays at Winterhouse, she has an unexpected adventure at the old, luxurious hotel. In its mammoth library, book-loving Elizabeth finds A Guide for Children, a magical book that includes a chapter on an alphabet grid, Vigenère Square, for encoding messages. With the help of Freddy Knox, a boy who shares her love of puzzles, she tries to discover the keyword that will unravel a coded message, written on pages of the book pictured in a portrait of the hotel’s founder, Nestor Falls. Elizabeth is convinced that doing so will clear up the mystery of strange events occurring at Winterhouse and her odd feelings that she has a special connection with the hotel. Readers who like a bit of magic in stories of adventure and mystery can look forward to the sequel, The Secrets of Winterhouse, expected to publish in December 2018.
    —CA

    Ages 12–14

    The Legends of the Lost Causes (Legends of the Lost Causes #1). Brad McLelland & Louis Sylvester. 2018. Henry Holt.

    Legends of the Lost CausesIt’s 1855 and 13-year-old Keech Blackwood is living with a family of orphans, Pa Abner, and Granny Nell at Carson’s Home for Lost Causes in the northwestern Missouri hills when a stranger, Bad Whiskey Nelson, comes looking for Pa Abner. When Pa Abner refuses to reveal the location of the powerful Char Stone he is seeking, Bad Whiskey has his zombie outlaws kill him and burn the orphanage. As Keech, the only survivor, sets out to find the Char Stone before Bad Whiskey does, he meets up with other orphans. Upon learning that they share a mysterious bond related to the Char Stone, they band together, intent on avenging the deaths of their families. What follows in an action-packed journey, fraught with dangers and epic battles against the zombies. Readers can expect more thrills and suspense as the group of five orphans, which has adopted the name “The Lost Causes,” continues their adventures in The Fang of Bonfire Crossing (expected to publish in February 2019).
    —CA

    The Science of Breakable Things. Tae Keller. 2018. Random House.

    The Science of Breakable ThingsWorried about her mother, who has slipped into deep depression, seventh grader Natalie hatches a desperate plan to rekindle her mother’s interest in life by returning to the place in New Mexico where she first saw the Cobalt Blue Orchids—flowers that defy odds to survive in a toxic environment. A botanist, her mother has built her research around this species, and Natalie is sure that the rare plant holds the key to restoring her health. When she is partnered with her best friend Twig and science geek Dari for a science class project, Natalie is hopeful that their design for an egg drop contest might win the $500 prize, money that could fund the trip to New Mexico. Keller effectively weaves in the application of the scientific method to solve problems and the importance of therapy, exploring territory not typically addressed in books for young readers: parental depression. This book pulls no punches about the challenges of depression and how it affects family members.
    —BW

    Ages 15+

    The Beloved Wild. Melissa Ostrom. 2018. Feiwel and Friends.

    The Beloved WildDisillusioned with the path that lies ahead of her in New Hampshire in 1807, 16-year-old Harriet Winter sets out for uncharted territory. She is tired of the role thrust upon her as a female and is disinterested in being married off to a farmer. All she can see ahead of her is a series of pregnancies or death in childbirth. Her brother Gideon hopes to prove himself in the wilderness as he makes plans to stake a claim on several acres in New York’s Genesee Valley. After offending her family and would-be suitor, Harriet accompanies Gideon, cuts her hair, and lives like a boy. Although she relishes the freedom, the work is hard, and eventually she comes to terms with what she wants and realizes that she may have thrown away what she values most. This is a well-written, captivating piece of historical fiction with a flawed protagonist who often behaves rashly but will earn the respect of readers.
    —BW

    A Girl Like That. Tanaz Bhathena. 2018. Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

    A Girl Like ThatSixteen-year-old Zarin Wadia, a part Hindu, part Parsi orphan lives with her uncle and aunt in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Outspoken, smart, and brave, Zarin, who smokes and dates boys, is known as “a girl like that,” the kind with whom no one respectable wishes to associate. Much of the judgments of Zarin come from her own family and her classmates and not the oppressive ruling class or religious police. This complex story, which begins with the death of Zarin and her 18-year-old friend Porus Dumasia in a car accident, is told partly from their post-death points of view and partly by other characters. Readers come to understand that there is much more to both adolescents and to ponder the “what ifs” of their lives. There are many passages that are hard to read, but others remind readers of the healing power of love, whether it be the affection lavished on a pet cat or the unflagging love of a boy for a girl who never regards him as a serious romantic interest. This book is sure to spark rich discussion and controversy about the many issues it raises. Ultimately, it is clear that what everyone seems to think they know about Zarin is nowhere near the whole truth.
    —BW

    Barbara A. Ward teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in literacy at Washington State University, Pullman. She spent 25 years teaching in the public schools of New Orleans, where she worked with students at every grade level, from kindergarten through high school as well as several ability levels. She is certified in elementary education, English education, and gifted education. She holds a bachelor's degree in communications and a master's degree in English education from the University of Tennessee and a PhD in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of New Orleans. Carolyn Angus is former director of the George G. Stone Center for Children's Books, Claremont Graduate University, in Claremont, California.

    These reviews are submitted by members of the International Literacy Association's Children's Literature and Reading Special Interest Group (CL/R SIG) and are published weekly on Literacy Daily.

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    Biographies and Memoirs

    By Sandip Wilson and Carolyn Angus
     | Apr 16, 2018

    Biographies reflect human experiences in different settings. They are sources of information about times and places in history, as well as accounts of the lives of individuals, including some forgotten in the historical record. The biographies and memoirs reviewed here are thought-provoking stories about lives and moments and periods of history.

    Ages 4–8

    The Flying Girl: How Aída de Acosta Learned to Soar. Margarita Engle. Ill. Sara Palacios. 2018. Atheneum/Simon & Schuster.

    The Flying GirlWith lyrical text and bright, mixed-media illustrations, this biography tells the story of how Aída de Acosta (1884–1962) “learned to soar” after seeing a man fly an airship. “If that man can fly, so can I. / All I need are some lessons / and a chance to try!” Although her mother objects, 19-year-old Aída takes lessons from the airship’s inventor, Alberto Santos-Dumont, and—after only three sessions—flies solo. Landing in a polo field, Aída is taunted by observers for unladylike behavior, but Alberto cheers, “You flew! You’re a hero, such a brave inspiration for all the girls of the world!” An author’s note provides background information on Aída’s historic flight near Paris in 1903.
    —CA

    Joan Procter, Dragon Doctor: The Woman Who Loved Reptiles. Patricia Valdez. Ill. Felicita Sala. 2018. Alfred A. Knopf/Random House.

    Joan Procter, Dragon DoctorFascinated by reptiles as a child (she even had a baby crocodile), Joan Beauchamp Procter (1897–1931) eventually became the assistant to the curator of reptiles and fish at the Natural History Museum in London. Her scientific research and creation of reptile exhibits led to her appointment as curator upon her mentor’s retirement. Proctor later designed the London Zoo’s Reptile House, including a special enclosure for the newest additions to the zoo’s reptile collection: two seven-foot-long Komodo dragons. Back matter for this biography includes colorful illustrations of Procter working with reptiles, additional information about her life and work, notes on Komodo dragons, and a bibliography.
    —CA

    Marie Curie. Demi. 2018. Henry Holt.

    Marie CurieBorn in Poland in 1867, Maria Sklodowska Curie dreamed of obtaining a university education at a time when women in Poland were not allowed to attend universities. In 1891, she enrolled at the Sorbonne in Paris, where she not only earned degrees in physics and mathematics, but was also the first woman to earn a doctorate in science in Europe. In 1903,  Curie became the first woman to be awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics (shared with her husband, Pierre Curie, and Henri Becquerel) for research on the radioactivity of uranium. In 1911, Curie won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her discovery of the elements polonium and radium. Demi’s biography, complemented by colorful mixed-media illustrations, educates readers about Curie's scientific accomplishments and their implications. Back matter includes a timeline, references, and additional resources. 
    —SW 

    Up & Down: The Adventures of John Jeffries, First American to Fly. Don Brown. 2018. Charlesbridge.

    Up & DownAt the end of the American Revolution, loyalist John Jeffries (1745–1819), a Boston physician, fled to England, where he became one of the thousands of Londoners who marveled at the sight of the first manned balloon flight. Seeing the opportunity to measure temperature at different altitudes and observe air currents, Jeffries, an amateur meteorologist, paid the famous French balloonist Jean-Pierre Blanchard to accompany him on a flight over London. The success of the voyage led Blanchard and Jeffries to plan a flight across the English Channel. Beautifully illustrated in oil-based pencil and watercolor, Don Brown chronicles the perilous journey to France made on January 7, 1785. Back matter includes a “More Hot Air” endnote, a bibliography, and quotation sources. 
    —CA

    Ages 9–11

    Confucius: Great Teacher of China. Demi. 2018. Shen’s Books/Lee & Low.

    ConfuciusDemi introduces young readers to Confucius (551 BCE–479 BCE) in this beautifully crafted biography. She weaves together legend and fact to tell the story of the Chinese philosopher and teacher’s life and work and incorporates numerous quotes from The Analects, in which students and followers compiled Confucius’ sayings after his death. Her distinctive, delicate illustrations, done in paint and ink and framed in gold and red, exquisitely complete this portrait of Confucius, whose principles of governance and education continue to have influence today.
    —CA

    The Secret Kingdom: Nek Chand, a Changing India, and a Hidden World of Art. Barb Rosenstock. Ill. Claire A. Nivola. 2018. Candlewick.

    The Secret KingdomFull of stories he heard from his family and visitors in his village north of Lahore (now Pakistan), Nek builds a small world of his own on the banks of a stream, creating a palace from silt and people and animals from clay, sticks, and rocks. With the 1947 partitioning of the country, he is forced to flee his home and settle in Chandigarh, the first planned city in the new India. Lonely for the people and places of home, Nek builds “a secret kingdom” with rocks, boulders, and discarded items on undeveloped scrubland near the city. When the government threatens to destroy his magical world, which he has kept secret for 15 years, people from Chandigarh come to the rescue. Beautiful watercolor and gouache illustrations suggest a sense of place. A final double gatefold opens to display a collage of photographs with views of the 25 acres of artwork (on the 45-acre “Rock Garden” site) that Nek Chand created over his lifetime. Back matter includes an author’s note with additional information about Nek Chand Saini (1924–2015) and the Rock Garden and a bibliography.
    —SW   

    Ages 12–14

    Claiming My Place: Coming of Age in the Shadow of the Holocaust. Planaria Price (with Helen Reichmann West). 2018. Farrar, Straus and Giroux .

    Claiming My PlacePrice tells the life story of Barbara Reichmann (1916–2007), born Gucia Gomolinska in central, predominantly Catholic Poland. As a teen before World War II, she becomes a leader in the Zionist movement—until the Nazis invade Poland in 1939 and establish the first Jewish ghetto in her town of Piotrko´w Trybunalski. After obtaining false identity papers as Danuta Barbara Tanska (nicknamed Basia), blonde, blue-eyed Gucia poses as a Catholic Pole and spends the war years working in Poland, Germany, and Switzerland, always in danger of being caught. At the end of the war, she reunites with a few surviving family members, and in 1951 immigrates to the United States. “New Beginning,” an afterword by her daughter, Helen Reichmann West, completes this story of a courageous young woman determined to survive the Holocaust. Special features that help tell the story include a 16-page photo album, maps, and an endnote on what happened to members of the Gomolinski family and other characters in the story.
    —CA  

    March Forward, Girl: From Young Warrior to Little Rock Nine. Melba Pattillo Beals. Ill. Frank Morrison. 2018. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

    March Forward, GirlMelba Beals, one of the nine students who integrated Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, in 1957, recounts her family life, elementary and middle school days, and her striving for a quality education. Knowing from a young age the discrimination and segregation that oppressed the black community, she dreamed of freedom and of the opportunities that white people enjoyed. Beals describes her efforts to be an exemplary student with the support of her grandmother and modeling of her mother, against great odds. The book includes archival photographs, an epilogue, and a note to readers that provide more information about her life.
    —SW

    Roses and Radicals: The Epic Story of How American Women Won the Right to Vote. Susan Zimet. 2018. Viking/Penguin.

    Roses and RadicalsHighlighting leaders of the women's suffrage movement, Zimet chronicles the turbulent journey that led to the passage of the 19th Amendment. She details the life and work of such notables as Lucy Stone and Alice Paul to make suffrage a national priority. The depiction of their persistence, in the face of good, bad, and ugly public responses, is dramatic and heartrending. Quotations from the suffragists’ writings and speeches bring their personalities into focus. With archival photographs, source notes, and a bibliography, the book is a valuable historical resource and an exciting reading experience. 

    —SW 

    Ages 15+

    Americanized: Rebel Without a Green Card. Sara Saedi. 2018. Knopf/Random House.  

    AmericanizedOnly 2 years old when her family fled Iran, Sara didn't learn of her undocumented status until 11 years later, when her older sister needed a Social Security number to apply for an after-school job. This memoir chronicles her teenage years, during which she longs for a boyfriend and her own car, enjoys the company of friends, and experiences anguish about the security of her family as they spend years trying to obtain legal citizenship. Saedi’s humorous description of the traditions and practices of her extended family and Iranian culture make this informative book a pleasure to read.
    —SW

    Fly Girls: The Daring American Women Pilots Who Helped Win WWII. P. O’Connell Pearson. 2018. Simon & Schuster.

    Fly GirlsWhen the United States entered World War II, military officials realized that skilled pilots were needed to operate bigger and more powerful aircrafts. But only men were allowed in military airplanes, even if the expert pilots who trained them to fly were women. A group of 1,100 determined female pilots—who had to prove their worth time and time again—ultimately formed the Women Air Force Service Pilots (WASP). They risked their lives testing new aircraft designs and flying for target practice. They transported planes from one post to another in the U.S. and rose to meet each challenge with resourcefulness and expertise—even when met with discrimination from military personnel. The book includes source notes, an extensive bibliography, and an epilogue noting lives of the pilots after the WASP was disbanded and the recognition they finally received in the 21st century.
    —SW 

    Sandip LeeAnne Wilson serves as professor in the School of Education and the English Department of Husson University, Bangor, Maine. Carolyn Angus is former director of the George G. Stone Center for Children's Books, Claremont Graduate University, in Claremont, California.

    These reviews are submitted by members of the International Literacy Association's Children's Literature and Reading Special Interest Group (CL/R SIG) and are published weekly on Literacy Daily.

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    More Poetry, Please

    By Nancy Brashear and Carolyn Angus
     | Apr 11, 2018

    Join in the celebration of National Poetry Month in April by sharing poetry in your classrooms and libraries. The recently published books reviewed in this week’s column include poems that lead us to look at our world, our culture, and our lives in special ways while also encouraging an appreciation of the beauty and power of the language of poetry. Make a place for poetry in the curriculum each day in April—and throughout the year.

    Ages 4–8

    Hidden City: Poems of Urban Wildlife. Sarah Grace Tuttle. Ill. Amy Schimler-Safford. 2018. Eerdmans.

    Hidden CityIn 28 free verse poems, Sarah Grace Tuttle celebrates plants and animals that are city dwellers: moss and wildflowers in sidewalk cracks; peregrine falcons nesting on skyscrapers; bees, ants, snails, and garter snakes in community gardens; raccoons feasting on garbage from upturned pails; pigeons and ducks in city parks; and other urban wildlife. Lines such as, "A peregrine falcon / six weeks old / teeters thirty-two stories above / busy sidewalks and a traffic jam" in the poem “Falcon Fledge,” about a fledgling’s first flight, remind readers to take time to observe the “hidden city” around them. Amy Schimler-Safford’s colorful, richly textured digital illustrations provide stunning city scenes through the season that complement Tuttle’s vivid word pictures. Back matter includes “Fun Facts About the Wildlife in These Poems” and “Suggestions for Further Investigation.”
    —NB  

     I Am Loved. Nikki Giovanni. Ill. Ashley Bryan. 2018. Caitlyn Dlouhy/Atheneum/Simon & Schuster.

    I Am LovedNikki Giovanni’s brief poems, set in black or white type against colored backgrounds against Ashley Bryan’s glorious illustrations—rendered in bright colors in tempera and watercolor and featuring black children, their parents, and animals—celebrate love in all its different forms. Some of the poems reflect pride of African-American heritage— “I reflect the strengths / Of my people / And for that alone / I am loved”). Others, such as the final rhythmic verse, encourage play and movement— “. . . do the rosa parks / say no no / do the rosa parks / throw your hands in the air . . . ”  Kindness, compassion, and action ring clear in this joyful picture book. 
    —NB

    Rooster Summer. Robert Heidbreder. Ill. Madeline Kleeper. 2018. Groundwood/House of Anansi.

    Rooster SummerA young brother and sister spend the summer at their grandparents’ farm with Rexter the Rooster (“roo-da-doodling at our sides”), Seed-Sack (the mule with a “slow swaying back”), Tuftin (a “spiky-haired … girl cat”), and Ginger-Tea, the new dog and defender of the chicken coop (with her “tawny, spicy-looking” coat). Poems, accompanied by vignettes and full-page illustrations in sepia tones, celebrate day-to-day adventures: gathering eggs from the coop and bringing them back to the farmhouse with Seed-Sack, swinging on a rope from the hayloft, taking a hayride under the stars, and getting a surprise at the end of the summer. An endnote describes the origin of this story in verse, which is based on Robert Heidbreder’s childhood memories.
    —NB

    Seeing into Tomorrow: Haiku by Richard Wright. Richard Wright. Nina Crews (Ed.). Ill. Nina Crews. 2018. Millbrook/Lerner.

    Seeing Into TomorrowEach of the double-page spreads of this beautifully designed picture book pairs a haiku by the well-known African American writer Richard Wright (1908–1960) with a photo collage by Nina Crews. Together, the 12 poems and illustrations celebrate the activities and observations of African American boys at different times of the year. The book begins with “Just enough of snow / For a boy’s finger to write / His name on the porch.” It ends with “A spring sky so clear / That you feel you are seeing / Into tomorrow.” Crews’ brief introduction includes a photograph of Wright reading to his young daughter. Crews appends a note on haiku, a brief biography of Richard Wright, a note on the illustrations, and a list of books for further reading.
    —CA

    With My Hands: Poems About Making Things. Amy Ludwig VanDerwater. Ill. Lou Fancher & Steve Johnson. 2018. Clarion/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

    With My HandsTwenty-six poems about making things, presented in the first-person voice of the maker, are paired with mixed-media and collage illustrations of children working projects (building a bird house, soap carving, making a collage, creating origami shapes, knitting, and more) or showing the results (a boat made from twigs and foil, a sock puppet, or paper snowflakes). Each poem captures some aspect of the creative endeavor and the joy of making “something new / that / never / was / before.”  There is even a poem that serves as a reminder—or a warning—about expecting a mess. “Yes. It’s my mess. / Do not let it distress you. / I’m making a project / that just might impress you. / Projects are messy— / all makers agree. / And the messiest maker / of projects is . . . me.”
    —CA

    Ages 9–11

    Earth Verse: Haiku from the Ground Up. Sally M. Walker. Ill. William Grill. 2018. Candlewick.

    Earth VerseFrom a description of the layers of the Earth (fragile outer crust, / shell around mantle and core— / Earth: a hard-boiled egg”), to the eruption of a volcano ("hotheaded mountain / loses its cool, spews ash cloud— / igneous tantrum”) to groundwater (“underground water / trickles through a sandstone sponge, / pools inside the well”), 29 haikus, paired with impressionistic colored pencil illustrations, playfully explore the Earth’s geology. Back matter includes additional information on the Earth, minerals, rocks, fossils, earthquakes, volcanoes, atmospheric and surface water, glaciers, and groundwater as well as suggestions for further reading.
    —CA

    The Horse’s Haiku. Michael J. Rosen. Ill. Stan Fellows. 2018. Candlewick.

    The Horse's HaikuHaiku, presented in three sections (“In the Field,” “At the Barn,” and “In Saddle”), explores such shared experiences of horses and humans in pastoral settings as the birthing of a foal, caring for cattle in the fields, and enjoying a ride onthe beach at low tide. Lush watercolor paintings, rendered in earth tones with touches of red and blue, complement the haiku for a rich sensory experience. Back matter includes “Grazing: A Note on the Haiku” in which Rosen makes an apt comparison: “horse champs another / clump of grass . . . munching . . . chewing— / like this haiku!”
    —NB

    In the Past. David Elliott. Ill. Matthew Trueman. 2018. Candlewick.

    In The PastIn the Past is an invitation to step back into prehistoric times to meet animals from each of the geologic periods of the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic Eras. David Elliott’s clever poems, written in a variety of formats, and Matthew Trueman’s striking mixed-media illustrations present portraits of 29 fascinating prehistoric creatures, from the trilobite of the Cambrian Period (544–505 million years ago) to the genus Mammuthus of the Quaternary Period (1.8 million years ago–present). For example, one of four poems about animals from the Jurassic Period (208–144 million years ago) is a terse verse about Dilophosaurus: “Blessed / with / crests.”Back matter includes an author’s note and a “Notes on the Animals: The Facts That Inspired the Poems” section.
    —CA

    Ages 12–14

    Jabberwalking. Juan Felipe Herrera. 2018. Candlewick.

    JabberwalkingThis energetic, stream-of-consciousness, poetry handbook with black-and-white scribble artwork created by Juan Felipe Herrera will help you turn your “Jabber Burbles” to “Poetry.” After taking the reader on a zany airplane trip to the Library of Congress (Herrera served as the U.S. Poet Laureate from 2015–2017), he spins off to Pluto in search of his dog, Lotus, where he runs into former student Zandunga García, a “Jabberblogger” from Bunion Junction. Interspersed between experimental forms of poetry writing exercises are autobiographical excerpts from Herrera’s “Jabber Notebook.” By the end of the book, like Herrera, you may have discovered that as a Jabber Walker writer you too can “make all life so beautiful your heart becomes a diamond-galaxy that shines out fast flickering, moving, turning on lights—everywhere.” And for added inspiration, you’ll want to read Lewis Carroll’s “Jabberwocky.” 
    —NB

    Poetry for Kids: William Shakespeare. William Shakespeare. Marguerite Tassi (Ed.). Ill. Mercè López. 2018. MoonDance/Quarto.

    Poetry for Kids William ShakespeareThis beautifully crafted book, curated for young readers by Shakespeare scholar Marguerite Tassi, includes 31 of William Shakespeare’s most famous speeches, verses, and sonnets, beginning with “All the World’s a Stage” from As You Like It and ending with “Our Revels Now Are Ended” from The Tempest. The selections are accompanied by Spanish artist Mercè López’s expressive artwork and made more accessible through the inclusion of a glossary of words from the verse that the reader might find difficult to understand on the same page, in smaller italic print. Tassi gives a brief introduction to the life and work of the English playwright, actor, and poet, William Shakespeare (1564–1616), and adds a brief commentary on each selection in an appended “What William Was Thinking” section.
    —CA

    Ages 15+

    Voices in the Air: Poems for Listeners. Naomi Shihab Nye. 2018. Greenwillow/HarperCollins.

    Voices in the AirIn this collection of almost 100 poems, Naomi Shihab Nye honors people from the past and present with her accessible poetry through which she offers insights and advice—“Why didn’t you take a photograph / out the window of every place you ever stayed?”—and advocates mindfulness—“Can we go outside and listen?” Nye focuses on details that might slip by without notice. For example, in a poem about gossip, Nye observes that Ernest Hemingway ate an apple before writing, which “might or might not have explained his crisp, / short sentences,” Most of all, she reminds readers to expand their lives. “Your day is so wide it will outlive everyone. / It has no roof, no sides.” Back matter includes detailed biographical notes on “the great voices” of the past and present that have inspired Nye and others. 
    —NB

    Nancy Brashear is Professor Emeritus of English at Azusa Pacific University, in Azusa, California. Carolyn Angus is former director of the George G. Stone Center for Children's Books, Claremont Graduate University, in Claremont, California.

    These reviews are submitted by members of the International Literacy Association's Children's Literature and Reading Special Interest Group (CL/R SIG) and are published weekly on Literacy Daily.

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    International Children’s Books

    By Laura Cutler and Carolyn Angus
     | Apr 02, 2018

    Sponsored annually by the International Board on Books for Young People, International Children’s Book Day is celebrated on or around Hans Christian Andersen’s birthday, April 2, to inspire a love of reading and to spotlight children’s books around the world. The theme of this year’s celebration is “The small is big in a book.” In recognition, we reviewed the following new works of international literature.

    Ages 4–8

    Aquarium. Cynthia Alonso. 2018. Chronicle.

    AquariumIn Argentinian artist Cynthia Alonso’s wordless picture book (originally published in Portugal), a young girl ventures to a dock and gazes into the water below. Vibrant shades of blue set against soft pastels create visual symmetry between the protagonist and the surrounding water. A red fish, colored to match the fish printed on the girl’s dress, unexpectedly leaps onto the dock and the girl decides to take it home. There, she creates an elaborate system of waterways for the fish from various sized containers and tubes. Her construction plans take over the house, but she eventually realizes that the fish belongs back in the water—not in the living room! With a nod to the happiness that can be found by letting go, the back endpaper offers a satisfying conclusion to the story with the depiction of the girl and fish swimming together. 
    LC

    Get on Your Bike. Joukje Akveld. Trans. Laura Watkinson. Ill. Philip Hopman. 2018. Eerdmans.

    Get On Your BikeAn argument between best friends Bobby (a panda) and William (a dog) ends with William shouting, “Go on! Just get on your bike and leave!” And that’s just what Bobby does. He rides through busy city streets still fuming over his squabble with “buffle-brained” William. Riding into the countryside, Bobby calms down and begins to think about where to go and what to do next. Decision made, he speedily cycles back to William’s home. After an exchange of apologies, Bobby begins to think about a bike ride with William the next day. The text for this oversized picture book (originally published in The Netherlands) appears in small boxes in the upper left of each colorful, richly detailed double-page spread. It’s fun—and not so easy—to spot Bobby in his red hoodie on each page.
    —CA

    Herodotus the Hedgehog. Jean-Luc Buquet. 2018. Eerdmans.

    HerodotusAfter witnessing Bear worshipping the Mighty Bear Spirit, Herodotus, a curious hedgehog, wants to know if other animals have their own Great Spirits. After Fox tells him about the Great Fox, Herodotus visits Venerable, the old and wise hedgehog, and asks about the Great Spirit stories of hedgehogs. Venerable explains to Herodotus that, as humble creatures, hedgehogs know only one important fact:"that the sun rises and sets each day.” Herodotus is underwhelmed by Venerable’s teachings, and continues to ask other animals, including Weasel, Sheep, Wolf, and Hoopoe, about Great Spirits. Confused, he contemplates what he has heard. When Venerable joins him, his “I understand, I think. Let’s go see the sunset,” suggests he’s discovered the importance of appreciating each new day as it comes. Originally published in French, this thought-provoking story will leave readers contemplating their own beliefs about life’s big questions and remind them of the significance of appreciating what life has to offer.
    LC

    I Really Want to See You, Grandma. Taro Gomi. 2018. Chronicle.

    I Really Want to See You, GrandmaIn this tale (translated from Japanese) about the power of love and determination, Yumi and her grandmother each set off to visit each other. As they arrive at their destinations, each discovers that her loved one is not home. Nothing will stop Yumi and her grandmother from seeing each other, so they continue to go back and forth, unknowingly passing each other on the way. This humorous story, told through simple text and colorful illustrations, portrays Yumi and her grandmother employing various modes of transport to reach one another—including bus, train, taxi, scooter, and even grandma on a motorcycle! Finally, Yumi and her grandmother run into each other on their travels and, to avoid future confusion, decide to designate a tree that is growing along the road as their special meeting spot.
    LC 

    Old Hat. Emily Gravett. 2018. Simon & Schuster.

    Old HatHarbet, a big-eyed, long-nosed, waggy-tailed dog, loved the warm and cozy hat that his Nana knitted for him, but, as a dinosaur, bear, and bird sporting Carmen Miranda-styled hats point out, his hat is an OLD HAT! So Harbet gets one of these “latest, most up-to-datest” hats, only to learn that the fashionistas have moved on. Determined to have the latest hat, Harbet reads Top Hat Magazine and is first in line at the hat shop on Hat Unveiling Day. Having amassed a pile of new but already declared out-of-fashion hats, Harbet decides to do something daring—go hatless. The surprise ending reveals that Harbet has become the new trendsetter. Gravett’s latest picture book, with humorous, hat-filled illustrations (rendered in pencil, watercolor, and acrylic ink), offers a gentle lesson: Doing your own thing is always in style.
    —CA

    On the Other Side of the Garden. Jairo Buitrago. Trans. Elisa Amado. Ill. Rafael Yockteng. 2018. Groundwood/House of Anansi.

    On the Other Side of the GardenMexican writer Jairo Buitrago’s spare text and Columbian artist Rafael Yockteng’s detailed, textured, digital illustrations tell the story of city girl Isabel, who has been left by her father at Grandmother’s house out in the country. As she joins three animals (an owl, a frog, and a mouse) on a moonlit walk in the garden, Isabel tells them that Mum lives in another country and that Dad has left her with Grandmother while he looks for work. They tell her that her grandmother is lonely and kind. Returning home, Isabel is greeted with a hug and reassurance that she can walk in the garden anytime. “This is your house, too.” There is the hope that Isabel will adapt to the reality of separation from her parents as she lives with Grandmother and explores beyond the fence around the garden.  
    —CA

    Who Was That? Olivier Tallec. 2018. Chronicle.

    Who Was ThatFans, young and old, of French author-illustrator Olivier Tallec’s Who Done It? (2015) and Who What Where? (2016) will be delighted to test their observation and memory skills in his new interactive picture book. After following a direction such as “Now, cover Roger—he’s on the diving board—with your hand,” the reader is asked a question. In this case, it’s “How many teeth does he have?” The answer: three. Readers soon realize that they need to carefully observe the cartoon-like illustrations if they are to have a chance at answering the questions posed. Older children can extend the fun of Who Was That? by making up their own questions about the illustrations to test the memory of a reading buddy.
    —CA

    Ages 9–11

    The Land of Neverendings. Kate Saunders. 2018. Delacorte/Random House.

    The Land of NeverendingsWhen Holly died, Emily not only lost her sister—she lost her connection to their imagined toy world, Smockeroon, the Land of Neverendings. Emily begins to have fantastical dreams and visions about Holly’s beloved stuffed animal, Bluey, and of the imaginary world of Smockeroon. Soon Emily realizes that these fantasies are real and that the magic of Smockeroon is seeping into the human world—leaving the toy world in a state of unrest. When those around her are also affected by Smockeroon’s magic, Emily knows she must do something to restore the balance between the two worlds. English author Kate Saunders takes readers on an unforgettable adventure as Emily and her friends try to save Smockeroon from certain disaster. This story presents an honest depiction of the grief experienced after losing a loved one and helps young readers see that happiness can be found even in times of tremendous sorrow.
    LC

    The Rabbit and the Shadow. Mélanie Rutten. Trans. Sarah Ardizzone. 2018. Eerdmans.

    The Rabbit and the ShadowThis French import is the story of “a Rabbit who wants to grow up, / an anxious Stag, / a Soldier at war, / a Cat who keeps having the same dream, / a Book who wants to know everything, / and a Shadow.”  With 10 short episodes and colorful, expressive ink-and-watercolor illustration (from small vignettes to full-page spreads), Belgium artist-illustrator Mélanie Rutten weaves together the stories of these characters into a complex tale of adventure, growing up, emotions, and dreams with a warm and satisfying ending.
    —CA

    Ages 12–14

    The Book of Pearl. Timothée de Fombelle. Trans. Sarah Ardizzone & Sam Gordon. 2018. Candlewick.

    The Book of PearlThis extraordinary fantasy chronicles the quest of Joshua Pearl, a prince (whose real name is Ilian) to reunite with his first love. Joshua Pearl is banished from the world of fairy tales—the land of Kingdoms—by his cruel and resentful brother. He magically arrives in Paris at the onset of World War II and is unaware that his love, Olia, a fairy, has also been banished to the human world. Because magic prevents Olia from revealing herself, she is forced to watch Joshua from the shadows. Readers are left spellbound by the magic and mystery of Joshua’s quest to return to the Kingdoms and reunite with Olia. Only at the story’s conclusion does French author Timothée de Fombelle reveal how Joshua and Olia find their way back to the Kingdoms and to each other.
    LC

    Ages 15+

    Ophelia. Charlotte Gingras. Trans. Christelle Morelli & Susan Ouriou. Ill. Daniel Sylvestre. 2018. Groundwood/House of Anansi.

    OpheliaTenth grader Ophelia is a loner, who seldom says anything. When an author visiting her Quebec high school gets no response from students when she asks for questions, however, Ophelia asks “Why do you write? What’s the point of writing?” At the end of the session, the author thanks Ophelia for speaking up and gives her a blue notebook, writing in it her address along with the message “If you feel like writing . . . Or you want to write to me . . .” The letters Ophelia writes to the author in the notebook and the art she begins to create in an abandoned building she comes across one night while out tagging walls with her signature little broken heart are the beginning of a journey of self-acceptance, finding friendship, and reaching out to other outsiders in this coming-of-age story with intriguing abstract and collage artwork incorporating French words.
    —CA

    Laura Cutler is a PhD student in the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences at the University of Delaware. Carolyn Angus is former director of the George G. Stone Center for Children's Books, Claremont Graduate University, in Claremont, California.

    These reviews are submitted by members of the International Literacy Association's Children's Literature and Reading Special Interest Group (CL/R SIG) and are published weekly on Literacy Daily.

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